Cassandra took part in our Creativity Works: Broadcasting programme

“I gained a lot from the Creativity Works: Broadcasting Programme. I was very new to the Media and Creative industry and I wasn’t really sure what I wanted to do. So Broadcasting really opened my eyes especially through the possibilities that were presented to us when we taken to stations such as NTS, Radar Radio and Capital FM.”

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Cassandra found out about our Creativity Works: Broadcasting Programme whilst she was interning at a start-up music and creative agency who worked in Protein. For Cassandra, the broadcasting programme was an opportunity to gain a unique insight into the world of broadcasting. For her, it was a nice opportunity to be in the room at companies that she had never been to before. It helped to open up her mind to broadcasting as a profession and that fact that there are so many ways to get into the broadcasting industry.

Cassandra feels that in many ways the course helped both professionally and personally. Professionally, it geared her towards a career in Production and broadcasting. Even though she wanted to get into music more heavily, the course helped her with actually creating and publishing some of her own stuff. The broadcasting programme gave her a sense of direction and was really good in terms of the practical skills that she learnt in terms of CV making, Brand building and Podcasting. Cassandra felt that the course gave her the confidence to stop waiting for a job to come around and instead start creating and publishing her own work. She believed she was now able to take more ownership over her own career. Personally, Cassandra was able to develop a great network with people who were part of the broadcasting industry. For her, the networking was one of the best things about the course as it was nice to network with like-minded creatives.

After the Broadcasting programme, Cassandra started working at Universal Music Group, in their Global Music Marketing department. She also went on to take part in our Meet-a-Mentor alumni programme, and then progressed on to doing the Channel 4 Production Trainee Scheme, which ultimately led her down the path of TV. Now Cassandra is Freelancing in the TV industry and has done some amazing freelance work such as covering the General Election Debate with ITV.

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What were you doing before you started the course with Create Jobs?

I was interning at a music and creative agency. It was a start-up who worked in Protein, which is how I met the Create Jobs team.

How was your experience on the course? Did you gain anything from it?

I gained a lot. The main thing was opening my eyes to the broadcasting scene because before I was very new to the media and creative industry. I wasn’t really sure what I wanted to do.

So all the possibilities that were presented to us, and taking us to different stations such as NTS, Radar and Capital was really helpful.

It was a nice opportunity to just be in the room at places that I had never gone to before. It helped to open up my mind to broadcasting as a profession and the fact that there are so many different streams and ways you can go into it.

How did the course impact your life both personally and professionally?

Professionally, it geared me towards Production and Broadcasting. I really wanted to get into music more heavily but also actually making stuff and publishing my own stuff.

It gave me direction and it was really good in terms of the practical skills that we learnt in terms of CV making, Podcasting which was a massive thing as well.

It kind of gave us permission to say, you know what you don’t have to wait for that job to come around, you can always get started by creating and publishing stuff yourself.

In many ways, it helped me professionally to work towards broadcasting which I am in now. It helped me move towards taking more ownership over my own career.

Confidence wise, it was the first time I had the confidence to start working on my own projects and to also network

Also the network I gained/developed with people on the scene, was one of the best things about the course. It was nice to network with like-minded creatives.

It was nice because we were all on different journeys, some people were older, some people were younger but the course helped to break down the stigma, that by 20 you have to know exactly what you’re doing.


What did you do after the course and what are you doing now?

After the course, I started working at Universal, in their Music Marketing Global field. I was working in the international department.

I then did Fran’s Meet a Mentor course and from there I went in television, I did a Channel 4 Production Trainee Scheme, which led me down a path of TV.

So now, I’m freelancing in TV. I have done stuff like the General Election Debate with ITV.

Ultimately, I would like to go down the Film-making route and directing my own stuff.

What is it like to exist as a black woman in the creative industry?

It’s really hard because I think there is a lot of focus on gaining entry-level positions for people of colour.

But the difficult thing is that I think sometimes when you enter into these spaces, particularly as a black woman, for example, my experience has been that it is quite difficult because then you find yourself in a sea of white, predominantly middle-class people who kind of have a shared culture and language that you’re just trying to assimilate into at first.

So it’s really isolating. A big thing for me is not seeing black people or people who are under-represented in the industry, in senior positions, which makes it harder to see how a certain career progresses.

Half of the industry is not just about how hard you work but instead about nepotism and being recommended, and people liking you for your personality.

It’s hard trying to navigate through the cultural languages when you’re the only one and it takes a toll. Surviving in the industry was very hard for me at first. There’s kind of an internal struggle about whether you assimilate into the culture or whether you try and find a way to bring your own experiences into the role that I’m doing.

It’s really difficult in terms of career progression. People always say they want diversity but you question whether they just want a surface-level diversity or whether they want diversity if thought.

It seems that usually, people don’t want you to really diversify what they’re doing, they just want to have a black person in the room to kind of legitimise what they’re doing.

Trying to navigate an industry that, although it’s amazing, can be quite fake in some ways

You don’t really see people who look like you at the top.
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